Expand protection for Tennessee’s rivers

Expand protection for Tennessee’s rivers

Ecotourism—including hobbies such as paddling, biking, hiking, and birdwatching—brings sustainable jobs and commerce to the region. This year is the 50th anniversary of The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. This is the perfect moment to build on the successes of the past…

NON-NATIVE VS. INVASIVE: GOOD, BAD OR OTHERWISE?

I am currently fascinated by the concept of non-native and invasive species. When are non-natives bad? Always or sometimes? Invasive species are always bad. But sometimes non-natives can be good for you. Take the plant, Mullein, for example. It doesn’t belong in East...

Wild American Ginseng and the Chinese Doctor

Dr. Iris Gao has moved from mainland China to Middle State Tennessee University in order to study Wild American ginseng. It just so happens that we have a lot of the root at Coal Creek farm in Eastern Tennessee. Dr. Gao visited recently with her colleague Dr. Elliot...

Grateful for Little Things

Last week I had the privilege of seeing AND filming a Northern Bobwhite (aka quail) at Coal Creek Farm in Eastern Tennessee. Sightings of these once ubiquitous little birds are rare. Having one slow down enough to film it is even rarer. The Northern Bobwhite (quail)...

Catching a Wild Elephant: Tennessee’s Piney River

There are several “Piney” River/Creeks on the Cumberland Plateau. The Piney River near Spring City, Tenn., is on the Walden’s Ridge portion of the Plateau. Its headwaters join with Moccasin Creek, Bumbee and Duskin creeks, before finding the confluence with Soak Creek and flowing through Spring City into the Tennessee River. In 1970 the Bowater Southern Paper Corporation donated the land to the State of Tennessee.

Page 1 of 712345...Last »